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Full text of "Rapid Population Growth Consequences And Policy Implications"

POPULATION PRESSURE ON FAMILIES
439
40
30-
10-
"Closely spaced,"  i.e.  second  and  third children after less  than  two and three  years of  marriage  respectively
"Other" i.e. second and third children after more than two and three years of marriage respectively
Birth  rank.    2
16-24
25-29 Mother's  age
30
30-,
20-
1Q-
"Closely spaced,"  i.e.  second  and  third children after less than two and three  years of  marriage  respectively
"Other," i.e. second and third children after more than two and three years of marriage respectively
I  &
IV  & V
Social  class
Figure 12. Comparison between postneonatal mortality of closely spaced and other births, (top) comparing three maternal age groups and (bottom) three social class groupings (see Figure 1), England and Wales, 1949-1950.
Source: Morrison et al. (27).
In discussing this finding the authors noted (63) that, "An even greater effect of short interval would be anticipated for the first bom of the twoaced" and compared the mortality rates in that group with the rates in all other births. Their results are shown in Figure 12, where it may be seen that in all maternal age groups and in all social classes the postneonatal mortality rates are higher in the closely spaced group than in the other groups. These rates are also higher in younger mothers, as we saw in the previous data, and a third closely spaced child is at greater risk than a second such child.